Monthly Archives: May 2014

Stem cells help women regrow breasts after cancer surgery

Stem cells help women regrow breasts after cancer surgery

A new technique, which uses stem cells, could help women regrow breasts after cancer surgery. Experts in the UK and Melbourne University in Australia say that the new breasts look natural and feel soft to touch and are much more comfortable than silicone implants. The researchers are now in a race to bring the technology(…)

Look, no embryos! The future of ethical stem cells

Look, no embryos! The future of ethical stem cells

The Future Of Ethical Stem Cells. For years, ethical issues hampered progress in stem cell research. Now, experts believe that developments in reprogrammed ‘iPS’ cells will truly revolutionise the treatment of life-threatening illnesses.  It is unclear at exactly what point the phrase “stem cell” entered the vernacular, one of very few scientific terms that achieve(…)

Donated umbilical cord blood stem cells ‘save’ leukaemia man

Donated umbilical cord blood stem cells ‘save’ leukaemia man

A man who was given 18 months to live after being diagnosed with leukaemia has said his life has been saved by stem cells taken from umbilical cords. David Pyne, from Baguley, Manchester, was given a transplant of cells donated following births in France and the US. The 60-year-old, who is in remission, was forced(…)

Stem cell transplant offers new hope for autism and Parkinson’s.

Stem cell transplant offers new hope for autism and Parkinson’s.

Stem cell transplant offers new hope for autism and Parkinson’s Breakthrough research involving a brain transplant of stem cells could offer hope for autism and Parkinson’s disease patients. The study, from Harvard University, has already proven successful with mice. Scientists transferred healthy stem cells from mouse embryos into the brains of adult mice who were unable(…)

Umbilical Cord Tissue being used to treat Multiple Sclerosis

Umbilical Cord Tissue being used to treat Multiple Sclerosis

Translational Biosciences, a subsidiary of Medistem Panama, has received the green light for a phase I/II clinical trial using human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSC) for multiple sclerosis from the Comité Nacional de Bioética de la Investigación (CNEI) Institutional Review Board (IRB). Mesenchymal stem cells harvested from donated human umbilical cord tissue after normal,(…)